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Author [ES] [MY] [PL] [PT] [IT] [DE] [FR] [NL] [DK] [NO] [GR] [TR] Topic: Accessory wires in the nose  (Read 12894 times)

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Offline bazz1975

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Re: Accessory wires in the nose
« Reply #60 on: July 13, 2018, 04:56:07 PM »
hey streethawk
can you post the pics of the connectors location, please? i  also couldn't find it in the gallery.... :018:

bazz1975

Offline iBuchon

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Re: Accessory wires in the nose
« Reply #61 on: November 12, 2018, 04:18:14 AM »
I see in the Owners Manual that Kawasaki says The vehicle has electrical accessory circuit (2 A fuse) for the socket and connectors. Always install a fuse 2 A or less for the circuit. Do not connect more than 15 W of total load to the vehicles electrical system or the battery may become discharge, even with the engine running.  Also, that the maximum current is 1.25 A for the accessory circuit. Im guessing the total load to the vehicles electrical system means just the accessory circuit. Not including the other factory circuits. Just double checking that I cant use this accessory circuit to power heated glove liners that say they use 11 watts for each glove and 1.7 A draw for the pair.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2018, 04:22:07 AM by iBuchon »

Offline NHRstein

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Re: Accessory wires in the nose
« Reply #62 on: November 12, 2018, 02:25:13 PM »
*Originally Posted by iBuchon [+]
I see in the Owners Manual that Kawasaki says The vehicle has electrical accessory circuit (2 A fuse) for the socket and connectors. Always install a fuse 2 A or less for the circuit. Do not connect more than 15 W of total load to the vehicles electrical system or the battery may become discharge, even with the engine running.  Also, that the maximum current is 1.25 A for the accessory circuit. Im guessing the total load to the vehicles electrical system means just the accessory circuit. Not including the other factory circuits. Just double checking that I cant use this accessory circuit to power heated glove liners that say they use 11 watts for each glove and 1.7 A draw for the pair.

Help yourself out a bit by eliminating the 10amp draw your headlights use. Swap those over to LED or HID and you have bought back an additional 5 amps of electrical load.
You Never See A Motorcycle Parked Outside Of A Psychiatrist's Office

Offline iBuchon

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Re: Accessory wires in the nose
« Reply #63 on: November 13, 2018, 11:33:48 PM »
Thanks for the heads up, but I guess Im just wanting someone with electrical knowledge to help me out with deciding if its unwise to run 1.7 A through the accessory wires. They recommend not going over 1.25 A. But there is a 2 A fuse. So, dont wire them to it, or no big deal?

Online zed9

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Re: Accessory wires in the nose
« Reply #64 on: November 14, 2018, 12:36:26 AM »
*Originally Posted by iBuchon [+]
Thanks for the heads up, but I guess Im just wanting someone with electrical knowledge to help me out with deciding if its unwise to run 1.7 A through the accessory wires. They recommend not going over 1.25 A. But there is a 2 A fuse. So, dont wire them to it, or no big deal?
What gauge wire is it? I'm an electrician, I know building wires without having to look up ampacity ratings. Automotive, not off the top of my head.
Go to google and look up ampacities of automotive wire. They'll be loads of charts. With 12 volt wring however, length is a big factor.
Without looking it up and guessing at the wire size, having never seen them, I'd say they could carry more than 2 amps. But like I said, I haven't seen them.

I would suspect that Kawasaki's main concern is not overloading the relatively small alternator in these bikes. Doing so would cause insufficient charge and you're battery will go dead while riding. Also, if the wires are switched through a relay, there may be some concern there. Touring bikes have higher output systems.

As said before, you can save some juice by swapping the headlights to LED. Other than that you can put in a larger fuse and hook up the gloves then check the voltage at the battery and see if it's getting enough while running. Should be something like 14-14.5 volts. Then feel the accessory wires to see if their heating up.
But as I said, I haven't seen them.

Offline NHRstein

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Re: Accessory wires in the nose
« Reply #65 on: November 14, 2018, 02:09:58 AM »
I wouldn't worry about pulling the 1.7A over the accessory wires, I believe they are 18 AWG, so should be good for 2.3A Double check the the wire gauge and if it is 18 or larger go for it. Also it is a good idea to check the battery voltage while the bike is at idle. the battery should be 12.8 resting with the engine off and 13.8+ not to exceed 14.5 for charging. If you see it higher than 14.5 you could be stressing out the voltage regulator and it is hiking up the voltage to compensate for a lack of current capacity.
You Never See A Motorcycle Parked Outside Of A Psychiatrist's Office

Offline Z900Arizona

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Re: Accessory wires in the nose
« Reply #66 on: July 11, 2019, 05:02:41 AM »
Has anyone used the accessory wires for a radar detector install?  (VValentine  one specifically).